Vaccines

Just like humans, animals can be affected by infectious diseases, some of which can be transferred to humans. As responsible pet owners that want to keep your animals safe and healthy, we highly recommend that you vaccinate them in line with current guidelines.

Puppies and Kittens

Puppies and kittens receive initial protection against infectious diseases from their mother’s milk as long as she has been regularly vaccinated. However this protection only lasts for a few weeks and so your new addition will need to be vaccinated from an early age. Many puppies or kittens will go to their new homes having already received their first vaccinations, but check with their former owner before you bring them home.  If they have not yet been vaccinated, we recommend that they get their first vaccinations done as soon as possible after taking ownership of them.

As a guideline:

Puppies and kittens should be vaccinated at 8, 12 and 16 weeks of age.  
Booster vaccinations should be given annually or every three years depending on the vaccine.


Dogs - Many canine diseases can be prevented through vaccination.  A vaccination schedule prepared by Dr. Conrad can greatly contribute to good health and a longer life span for your dog.  Below are the most important diseases for which vaccines are currently available.

Rabies is a virus that is always fatal and attacks the nervous system.  It is transmitted mainly through the bite of an infected animal.  It is required by law that all dogs are vaccinated against rabies and the initial vaccine can be given at four months of age. 

DA2P-CPV is a combination vaccine that includes distemper, adenovirus, parvovirus and parainfluenza.  This combination vaccine, can also include leptospirosis (DA2P-L4-CPV).

Distemper is a widespread, often fatal disease and can result in severe multi-systemic disease involving the respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract, skin and central nervous system. 

Adenovirus type 1 and 2 causes infectious hepatitis and respiratory infection.  Hepatitis caused by adenovirus type 1 may cause severe liver damage and death.  Adenovirus type 2 is a cause of respiratory disease. 

Parvovirus is a disease that can cause vomiting and diarrhea resulting in dehydration.  Any dog can acquire parvovirus as it is very contagious, however young puppies and geriatric dogs are most at risk. 

Parainfluenza is a cause of infectious tracheobronchitis or kennel cough.  It is often a mild respiratory infection in otherwise healthy dogs. 

Leptospirosis is a bacterial infection which may lead to permanent kidney damage.  The disease may be spread to other dogs and humans. 

Bordetella is a cause of respiratory disease in dogs.  It is the primary causative agent in kennel cough or infectious tracheobronchitis. 

Canine influenza is also known as canine flu.  It is a contagious respiratory infection that causes respiratory disease in dogs. 

Cats

Many feline diseases can now be prevented through vaccination.  A vaccination schedule prepared by Dr. Conrad can greatly contribute to good health and a longer life span for your cat.  Below are the most important diseases for which vaccines are currently available.

Rabies is a virus that is always fatal.  It attacks the brain and central nervous system.  It can be transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected animal.   Rabies vaccinations are required by law to be given to dogs but it is highly recommended that cats are vaccinated against rabies as well.

Distemper, rhinotracheitis, calicivirus and pneumonitis is a combination vaccination. 

Feline distemper (panleukopenia) is the most widespread of all cat diseases and is extremely contagious.  It is characterized by fever, loss of appetite, vomiting and diarrhea.  It has an extremely high rate of death, especially among kittens. 

Feline viral rhinotracheitis (FVR) is a highly contagious respiratory infection characterized by sneezing, loss of appetite, fever and eye inflammation.  As the disease progresses, a discharge is noticeable from both eyes and the nose. 

Calicivirus (FCV) is another serious feline respiratory infection.  It often occurs simultaneously with FVR.  Symptoms are similar but may also include ulcers in the mouth. 

Feline pneumonitis is caused by the organism Chlamydia psittaci.  Symptoms are simliar to those of FVR and FCV. 

Feline leukemia is a viral disease which can take several forms.  Some cats have transient infections with few ill effects.  Others have persistent infections varying in severity, some of which may be fatal over time.  Extensive research has shown no relationship between feline leukemia and human leukemia.